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There is an appointment for a masterpiece 丨 "Corneal Image Atlas"

Posting time:2022-12-03 10:42:19

There is an appointment for a masterpiece 丨 "Corneal Image Atlas"

About the authors of Atlas of Corneal Imaging J. Bradley Randleman Professor J. Bradley Randleman is a professor of ophthalmology at Case Western Reserve University Cleveland Clinic Lerner School of Medicine, an ophthalmologist at the Cleveland Clinic, and a curator at the Kerr Eye Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. Deputy Director of the Department of Optical Surgery. Prof. Randleman specializes in cornea, refractive surgery, LASIK surgery, cataract and IOL surgery, complex cataract surgery, and the treatment of corneal ectasia. His research focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of ectatic corneal diseases, including keratoconus and postoperative dilation after LASIK, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of complications of refractive surgery. Professor Randleman received the Claus Dohlman Fellow Award, the American Society for Cataract and Refractive Surgery's inaugural Binkhorst Young Ophthalmologist Award, the Kritzinger Memorial Award, the International Society of Refractive Surgery Founder's Award, the President's Award, and the Inaugural Commendation Award, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology Secretariat Achievement Awards and Senior Achievement Awards. Since 2011, Professor Randleman has been the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Refractive Surgery. He has published more than 165 peer-reviewed papers in leading ophthalmic journals, as well as 40 books on refractive surgery evaluation, corneal cross-linking, and management of intraocular lens implant complications, and author of 4 textbooks. Book Description The Corneal Image Atlas is a comprehensive reference for ophthalmologists, ophthalmic surgeons and interns, covering all aspects of corneal imaging, from the interpretation of basic topographic maps to the application of advanced diagnostics, and contains more than 1,200 representative images Illustrative images and graphics of various equipment and technologies. Prof. J. Bradley Randleman, Prof. Marcony Santhiago, and Prof. William J. Dupps Jr jointly guide readers to analyze corneal images by using a large number of different techniques and independent equipment, presenting a complete basic method of corneal imaging and corneal disease pathological process, so that readers can Understand the pathological process of disease through visualization technology. Regardless of the testing equipment used and the form in which the test results are presented, the Corneal Image Atlas is available to help ophthalmologists identify subtle changes in the cornea and assess signs of weakening or pathology. Multiple replicates of the same clinical disease are shown with numerous complementary images of the same eye to provide a comprehensive presentation of each case. The Corneal Imaging Atlas provides information on: Corneal Topography Corneal Dilation Assessment Corneal and Refractive Surgery Assessments Clinical Relevance to Corneal Diseases Corneal and Refractive Surgery Complications Cataract Surgery Assessment The Corneal Imaging Atlas focuses on image analysis , to enable ophthalmologists to understand all the different techniques for corneal imaging, filling a significant gap in corneal imaging resources available today. References (swipe up and down to view) Foreword by Stephen D. Klyce, PhD IntroductionChapter 1Fundamental Concepts in Corneal ImagingMehdi Roozbahani, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; William J. Dupps, MD, PhD; and J. Bradley Randleman, MDØ Basic Definitions and TerminologyØ Confusing Clinical ConceptsØ Imaging DevicesØ Placido-Based Reflection DevicesØ LED-Based Reflective DevicesØ Tomography-Based Imaging DevicesØ Slit Scanning-Based TomographyØ Scheimpflug-Based TomographersØ Optical Coherence TomographyØ Very High–Frequency Digital UltrasoundØ Aberrometers for Wavefront AnalysisØ SummaryChapter 2Corneal Imaging Devices: Applications and Set UpMehdi Roozbahani, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; William J. Dupps, MD, PhD; and J. Bradley Randleman, MDØ Basic Device Set UpØ Specific Imaging DevicesØ Placido TopographyØ Scanning Slit Imaging (Orbscan II )Ø Scheimpflug Imaging (Pentacam)Ø Dual Scheimpflug/Placido Imaging (Galilei)Ø Scheimpflug/Placido Imaging (Sirius)Ø Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomogra phyØ Very High–Frequency Digital UltrasoundØ Imaging ArtifactsØ SummaryChapter 3Basic Topographic Patterns and Tomographic CorrelatesJ. Bradley Randleman, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J. Dupps, MD, PhDNotes on Maps in This SectionØ Section 1: Symmetric Nonastigmatic Patterns (Normal Patterns and Variants)Ø Section 2: Symmetric Astigmatic Patterns (Normal Variants)Ø Section 3: Asymmetric Astigmatic Patterns (Suspicious Patterns)Ø Section 4: Abnormal Asymmetric PatternsAgainst-the-Rule AstigmatismInferior SteepeningFocally Steep PatternsSkewed Radial AxesAsymmetric Bowtie With Skewed Radial Axis PatternTruncated Bowtie PatternVertical D PatternDrooping D PatternPellucid Marginal Degeneration–Like (Crab Claw) PatternØ Section 5: Keratometry/Topography Relationship in Ectatic CorneasChapter 4Epithelial MappingJ. Bradley Randleman, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J. Dupps, MD, PhD Epithelial Thickness and Remodeling PatternsØ Section 1: General Epithelial Map ping Images in Normal EyesØ Section 2: Epithelial Mapping in KeratoconusØ Section 3: Epithelial Mapping in Refractive Surgery ScreeningØ Section 4: Epithelial Mapping After Refractive SurgeryØ Section 5: Irregular Epithelial Mapping With Corneal IrregularitiesChapter 5Corneal Ectasia EvaluationsJ. Bradley Randleman, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J. Dupps, MD, PhDProgressively Advanced Presentations of Corneal EctasiasØ Section 1: Corneal Ectasia SuspectsØ Section 2: KeratoconusHighly Asymmetric (Clinically Unilateral) KeratoconusAsymmetric KeratoconusMild KeratoconusModerate KeratoconusSevere KeratoconusAtypical Keratoconus ImagesStable KeratoconusProgressive KeratoconusCorneal Hydrops Section 3: Pelluci Corneal DegenerationØ Section 4: Postoperative Corneal EctasiaChapter 6Corneal Imaging in Refractive Surgery EvaluationsJ. Bradley Randleman, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J. Dupps, MD, PhDNote on Screening RecommendationsØ Section 1: Suitab le Refractive Surgery Candidates: Normal Imaging and VariantsØ Section 2: Suspicious Imaging in Refractive Surgery EvaluationsØ Section 3: Abnormal Imaging in Refractive Surgery EvaluationsØ Section 4: Ectasia After LASIK Cases: Preoperative Corneal ImagingChapter 7Postoperative Patterns After Corneal and Refractive SurgeryJ. Bradley Randleman, MD ; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J. Dupps, MD, PhDØ Section 1: KeratoplastyØ Section 2: Incisional Refractive SurgeryØ Section 3: LASIKØ Section 4: Photorefractive KeratectomyØ Section 5: Small Incision Lenticule ExtractionØ Section 6: Phakic Intraocular LensØ Section 7: Intracorneal Ring SegmentsØ Section 8: OrthokeratologyØ Section 9: Corneal Cross-Linking ImagingØ Section 10: Therapeutic Topography-Guided AblationsChapter 8Corneal and Refractive Surgery ComplicationsJ. Bradley Randleman, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J . Dupps, MD, PhDØ Section 1: Ablation IssuesØ Section 2: LASIK Flap ComplicationsØ Section 3: I nterface ComplicationsØ Section 4: Ocular Surface ComplicationsØ Section 5: Complications After Incisional Refractive SurgeryØ Section 6: Complications After Intracorneal Ring Segments ImplantationØ Section 7: Phakic Intraocular Lens ComplicationsØ Section 8: Complications After KeratoplastyChapter 9Clinical/Topographic CorrelationsJ. Bradley Randleman, MD; Marcony R . Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J. Dupps, MD, PhDØ Section 1: Dry EyeØ Section 2: Corneal Scarring Resulting From Infectious KeratitisØ Section 3: Epithelial Basegeneration Membrane DystrophyØ Section 4: Salzmann's Nodular DeØ Section 5: PterygiumØ Section 6: Fuchs' Corneal DystrophyØ Section 7: Corneal Stromal DystrophiesØ Section 8: Limbal Stem Cell DeficiencyØ Section 9: Floppy Eyelid SyndromeChapter 10Corneal Imaging for Evaluations of Patients With CataractsJ. Bradley Randleman, MD; Marcony R. Santhiago, MD, PhD; and William J. Dupps, MD, PhDØ Section 1: Routine Cataract EvaluationsØ Section 2: Toric Intraocular Lens EvaluationsØ Section 3: Cataract Evaluations in Patients With Prior Laser Vision CorrectionØ Section 4: Cataract Evaluations in Patients With Prior Radial KeratotomyØ Section 5: Cataract Evaluations in Patients With Keratoconus Purchase source: Amazon official website

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